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[237] Church Names

Over the past decade we have seen more and more churches drop the denominational label from their church name, a trend about which G. Shane Morris of BreakPoint has written.  Instead of Alexander Methodist Church we are likely to see Alexander Community Church.  Community is a nice, soft word that seems among the most popular of substitutive choices.  There is range here, when it comes to names, with some rebrands choosing names running from Dream City and Destiny City Church to Submerge Church and The Foundry.

You can make an argument on both sides of this trend.  On the plus side, denominationalism has for decades been receding in importance.  Much of it has its roots in the doctrinal controversies of nearly a century ago, a time in which church attendance was common and the culture was more Christian friendly.  We live in a more hostile social environment now, filled with biblically illiterate people, who desperately need to meet Christ in a transforming way, long before they concern themselves with matters like infant baptism.  In short, being Methodist, Lutheran, or even Baptist may send a more line-drawing, theologically focused message, one that casts a narrow net in a time in which we need to welcome the masses of unchurched into a healthy experience with Christ.

On the other side, there is concern that the church is caving in to secular culture, trying not only to shed the tag of intolerance (what is more warm and fuzzy than community?) but perhaps their very beliefs as well.  Here the concern is that the church is cowering in the face of a culture that has little use for what is termed absolute truth.

According to the available research, the jury is out on whether this naming trend works.  There is a near even split on its effectiveness as a marketing tool.  I like it–though I stop a bit short of The Foundry–as I do not want what are traditional styles and minor theological nuances standing in the way of a person’s comfort in entering the church.  What is important, however, is that the message from the pulpit is biblically centered.  One that speaks truth, irrespective of that truth’s level of acceptance in contemporary culture.  Without that truth the church may as well be a foundry. DC

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