web analytics

[233] Thanksgiving

Consider the origin of Thanksgiving in the US.  The pilgrims were so overwhelmed with their blessings they felt compelled to continue the English tradition of Thanksgiving.   This amid the loss of loved ones en route to the New World, conflicts with Native-Americans, illnesses ending in death, short life spans, elevated infant mortality rates, and hosts of other dangers particular to that era.

We have far more reasons to give thanks today than those pilgrims did 400 years ago.

But I don’t think we are as thankful.  And I’m talking about Christians here.  We seem to live in a subliminal atmosphere of entitlement.  Meals should be tasty, cars should not break down, and cellphones should work.  We should be able to keep our jobs, illness should not strike us or those we love, and our churches should serve our needs.

In reality, we are not entitled to anything—not food, not cars, not cellphones, not employment security, not extended health, not the service of the church.  Those are blessings.  Gifts the pilgrims could not have imagined.  When we remove the illusion of entitlement we see as the pilgrims did, a gracious God in a fallen world.  We become thankful—and yes, happy.  Happy Thanksgiving. DC

Leave a Reply

Subscribe to this site
Get new Faith and Learning posts sent to you by email: